Another year for Byron Scott was always part of the process

All firing Byron Scott would do now is send the false message to Cavaliers fans that the organization was actually trying to win games in 2012-13 with the roster assembled.

This is what I reminded myself as Twitter erupted with cries for Scott's job last night following an uninspired loss to the Brooklyn Nets.

Winning this year specifically, however, was never the primary objective during this phase of the process.

Kyrie Irving was supposed to get better this season. Tristan Thompson was expected to develop as well and we were going to find out what we had with Dion Waiters and Tyler Zeller.

I resigned myself to these simple truths before the season ever began. The wins I was willing to accept as a welcomed diversion to losing while the Cavs tanked their way to another lottery.

The last tank-filled season of draft positioning that we’d hopefully endure as fans for the next decade.

Kyrie Irving has emerged as an All-Star in 2013. Tristan Thompson has out-performed the expectations that most had for him. Dion Waiters has averaged 14 points and earned rookie of the month honors for his progress made through February.

This much is enough for me in year two of the Kyrie Irving Era. 

I do realize the collective product is increasingly terrible and I know the Cavaliers are the worst defensive unit in the NBA at the moment. I also listened to a pregame press conference spent discussing aspects of a spider zone that eventually helped Brooklyn shoot 70-percent in the first half last night too.

So there is no way I blame any Cavs fan who is actually still paying attention at this point and believes that the coach should be fired for the product they are being forced to watch.

I actually left the Q with six minutes remaining myself because the pain I felt in my eyes was so fierce I feared the possibility of future blindness. 

In saying as much, though, the Cavaliers are still best served by allowing themselves to find out what Scott’s capable of doing when equipped with a reputable NBA roster and an organizational goal of winning basketball games.

He has not coached in that environment since arriving in Cleveland.

Phil Jackson could’ve assembled a staff that included John Wooden and Red Auerbach and not coached this Cavaliers roster into the 2013 playoffs. Not without Anderson Varejao for 50-plus games and Kyrie Irving for as much time as he’s missed.

Not without an NBA-caliber bench to support their young core that the Cavaliers didn’t stumble upon until after probing the Memphis Grizzlies with Jon Leuer’s contract in an attempt to acquire future draft picks.

The same Jon Leuer that was also once acquired to provide NBA-caliber depth off the Cavaliers bench for Kyrie Irving and company.

But while winning this year has never been part of the rebuild, winning next year is.

If the Cavaliers look like this one month into the 2013-14 campaign, I’ll gladly join the let’s-run-him-out-of-town-parade. In the meantime, though, we've endured too much losing over the last three years for all that suffering to be in vain.

Scott has helped point guards like Chris Paul develop into Hall of Famers. I want to see what he can do with his continued development of our guy.

I want to see if he can turn out the defensive effort he has during his tenures with the New Jersey Nets and New Orleans Hornets after the Cavaliers employ a collection of players who are interested in defending.

We haven’t actually determined that yet. 

Next season will include a different set of marching orders with a different set of goals. Let's find out what this team looks like then with the continuity that a healthy lineup of improving players provides.

Until then, just let this season die peacefully and prepare for the draft.

Brendan Bowers

About Brendan Bowers

I am the founding editor of StepienRules.com. I am also a content strategist and social media manager with Electronic Merchant Systems in Cleveland. My work has been published in SLAM Magazine, KICKS Magazine, The Locker Room Magazine, Cleveland.com, BleacherReport.com, InsideFacebook.com and elsewhere. I've also written a lot of articles that have been published here.

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